The auxiliary verbs “sein”, “haben” and “werden”

The auxiliary verbs “sein”, “haben” and “werden”

The verbs “sein” (to be) and “haben” (to have) are important verbs in the German language. Together with “werden” (will) they are used as an auxiliary verb to form composite tenses. In this function the auxiliary verbs have no lexical

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That’s how you learn the plural in Swiss German

Studying grammar is not everyone’s cup of tea, and there are certainly more exciting things to do. However, compared to other languages, Swiss German grammar is a piece of cake  because Swiss German is not a codified language. Nevertheless, there

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The brutal key difference between Swiss German and German

The brutal key difference between Swiss German and German

One country, four languages 8.42 million people live in Switzerland in an area of 41,285 km². Despite its small size, Switzerland has four official languages. In addition to High German, French, Italian and Romansh are spoken. And what about Swiss German?

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Let’s improve your Swiss German vocabulary

Let’s improve your Swiss German vocabulary

When you learn a foreign language, grammar is as important as vocabulary. Since Swiss German is not a codified language though, we prefer to concentrate on the vocabulary. Because what good is it if you know the grammar, but you

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What’s up with the «li» in Switzerland? An explanation for the Swiss German diminutive

What’s up with the «li» in Switzerland? An explanation for the Swiss German diminutive

Swiss German is characterized by the frequent use of the diminutive. This means that nouns are usually “reduced in size” by adding the suffix “li” to them. The counterpart in High German is the ending “chen/lein”. If you don’t speak

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