The brutal key difference between Swiss German and German

The brutal key difference between Swiss German and German

One country, four languages 8.42 million people live in Switzerland in an area of 41,285 km². Despite its small size, Switzerland has four official languages. In addition to High German, French, Italian and Romansh are spoken. And what about Swiss German?

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The ultimate tongue twister list: from chuchichäschtli to chriäsichueche

The ultimate tongue twister list: from chuchichäschtli to chriäsichueche

Have you just moved to Switzerland and your ear is still getting used to the sound of Swiss German? Or have you been living here for some time and perhaps already speak Swiss German? No matter which of the two

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The ultimate guide to learn Swiss German: success guaranteed

The ultimate guide to learn Swiss German: success guaranteed

You have moved to Switzerland and are now confronted with the local dialect, Swiss German. That is no reason to panic. Swiss German may sound difficult at first, but understanding and even speaking it can be learned and is not

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Love is all around – Swiss German love phrases

Love is all around – Swiss German love phrases

We Swiss are not known for being particularly passionate or emotional. The Italians or Spaniards are. But even if we show our feelings less in public, because we believe that this is a private matter, it does not mean that

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Let’s improve your Swiss German vocabulary

Let’s improve your Swiss German vocabulary

When you learn a foreign language, grammar is as important as vocabulary. Since Swiss German is not a codified language though, we prefer to concentrate on the vocabulary. Because what good is it if you know the grammar, but you

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What’s up with the «li» in Switzerland? An explanation for the Swiss German diminutive

What’s up with the «li» in Switzerland? An explanation for the Swiss German diminutive

Swiss German is characterized by the frequent use of the diminutive. This means that nouns are usually “reduced in size” by adding the suffix “li” to them. The counterpart in High German is the ending “chen/lein”. If you don’t speak

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Stay informed and use Swiss German newspapers and radio stations

Stay informed and use Swiss German newspapers and radio stations

The press landscape in Switzerland is diverse. On the one hand because of the trilingualism of the country, on the other because Swiss people consume more printed media than, for example, watch TV. Quite different from the south of Europe,

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With those Swiss German words you will survive

With those Swiss German words you will survive

In Switzerland we speak Swiss German. Although it comes from High German, it is a dialect of its own. A German from Stuttgart may still understand us, but a German from Hamburg has no chance. Although High German is his

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What is the official language of Switzerland?

What is the official language of Switzerland?

Due to its high quality of life and above-average wages, Switzerland is considered to be an attractive location. This is why many people aspire to relocate to this small Alpine country. In June 2004, the legal framework of the Swiss

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Do all Germans understand Swiss German?

Do all Germans understand Swiss German?

This is a question that cannot be answered either with a clear yes or a definite no. Some Germans can understand it quite well. Others do not understand a word – literally. Test your knowledge Let us pose a question:

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